Enterprise Risk Management

Heavy Rain to Hit San Francisco 

The forecast of heavy rain warrants a second look at your emergency preparedness efforts and flood safety precautions. 

Several free sandbag locations have been set up to meet the increased demand. In most locations, residents are required to bring a power bill or a current drivers license to show proof of address.

       San Francisco County

Public Works will provide San Francisco residents and business up to 10 free sandbags leading up to and during severe rainstorms. Sandbags can be retrieved Monday-Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Public Works’ operations yard, Marin Street/Kansas Street gate.

For information about where to obtain sandbags for other counties, go here.

 

Tips on How to Prepare for Major Storm, Severe Flooding:

Create a Communications Plan

It is important to be able to communicate with your family and friends in the event of a disaster. Whether it is having a specific person identified to contact for status updates or a safe location to meet up with family members, having a plan in place will give you peace of mind if disaster does strike.

Assemble an Emergency Kit

It is good practice to have enough food, water and medicine on hand at all times to last you at least 3 days in the case of an emergency. Water service may be interrupted or unsafe to drink and food requiring little cooking and no refrigeration may be needed if electric power is interrupted. You should also have batteries, blankets, flashlights, first aid kit, rubber boots, rubber gloves, and a NOAA Weather Radio or other battery operated radio easily available.

Know Your Risk

Is your home, business or school in a floodplain? Where is water likely to collect on the roadways you most often travel? What is the fastest way to get to higher ground? Knowing the answers to these questions ahead of time can save your life.

Sign Up for Notifications

Staying informed about the weather conditions is one of the best ways to know what you’re dealing. Downloading local weather apps to receive weather alerts and notifications is encouraged. The Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service also provides RSS feeds for weather alerts.

Prepare Your Home

1. If you have access to sandbags or other materials, use them to protect your home from flood waters if you have sufficient time to do so. Filling sandbags can take more time than you may think.

2. Have a professional install check-valves in plumbing to prevent flood waters from backing up into the drains of your home. Make sure your sump pump is working and consider having a backup. Make sure your electric circuit breakers, or fuses, are clearly marked for each area of your home.

3. Since standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding, ensure coverage by contacting your insurance company or agent to purchase flood insurance. This must be done before there is even a threat of flooding as insurance companies stop issuing policies if there is a threat of flooding. (i.e. an approaching hurricane). Many flood insurance policies take at least 30 days to go into effect so even if you can buy it as a storm is approaching, it may not protect your investment.

Prepare your Family/Pets

You may be evacuated, so pack in advance. Don’t wait until the last moment to gather the essentials for yourself, your family and/or your pets.

Charge Your Essential Electronics

Make sure your cell phone and portable radios are all charged in case you lose power or need to evacuate. Also make sure you have back-up batteries on hand.

Leave

If it is likely your home will flood, don’t wait to be ordered to leave; evacuate yourself! Make alternative plans for a place to stay. If you have pets, take them with you or make arrangements to board them at a facility well away from the flooding danger.]